Tag Archives: Mother’s Day classic

Grateful for two legs to carry me

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A father wearing pink leggings and matching tutu lifts his daughter with a similar outfit to his shoulders.

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Mother’s Day morning and there’s a sea of pink invading the school sports field. Socks, shirts, shorts, caps in shades of pink. Pink hair spray and bright pink lipstick. A pink bra worn over the outside of a shirt.

Women, men and children gather in support of those who have been through the experience of cancer, breast cancer in particular. To commemorate and celebrate those who have come through to the other side, and those who have not.

Among the stalls of sponsors and vendors, pink plastic capes are available for those who feel they require that extra bit of pink to complete their attire for the event. One such customer is a 12-year-old boy. IMG_2541Handing over his $2 he happily wraps the cape around his shoulders, and it hangs down to his ankles. I ask him if running with this somewhat unwieldy accessory might prove difficult or hamper his progress. After a moment’s contemplation, his response is simple and and direct:

‘Maybe a little, but how hard would it be if you were having to go through breast cancer?’

He is my son and knows a couple of women who have been down that road. My daughter runs faster and further than she is usually comfortable with, taking inspiration from the atmosphere of the day and contemplating those who have to endure much worse.


What is the point in running?

Why do I get up when it’s dark and cold and hit the pavement?

Because I can.

IMG_2509I run because I have two legs and two feet that can carry me forward.

I run for those who have endured disease or injury and face obstacles to get up and out there.

I run because of the guy with an awkward gait I see out walking, pushing past his limitation and stilted movements, greeting all passers with a smile and ‘Morning.

I run because of my friend with rheumatoid arthritis who can barely walk from the car to the house without a reasonable amount of discomfort.

I run for my kids, who put their best effort into everything they do and I want to do the same.

For everyone experiencing a physical or mental condition that restricts their activity, I run because I can.

In danger of becoming a Serious Runner

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There area casual runners and then there are serious runners, and a whole spectrum in between. Without realising or intending to, lately I’ve been feeling a shift further along the spectrum.

IMG_2449It seems to have crept up slowly, but I find myself becoming aware of and more involved in running related activities. Encountering people at work who are runners. Facebook ‘Recommended posts’ appear with running gear and race promos. More of my Facebook posts have some aspect of running in them. Having post-run debrief conversations ‘I started out strong but faded half-way through…’ 

I’m spending more time, and money, participating in runs. My wardrobe is expanding with t-shirts from running events. I have a collection of caps that I wear running – to keep the sweat out of my eyes and cover my less-than-tidy hair. The laundry basket seems to get fuller – and smeller – with running gear.

I have even signed up for the Mother’s Day Classic run, a charity fundraiser for breast cancer. Ever since I became a mother, somewhere around 14 years ago, all I can ever recall wanting was ‘a quiet morning and sleeping in’. Which of course never happens anyway, as any mother would know!

But now I am going out of my way to get out of bed and out of the door and running 8km. What am I thinking?!?IMG_2444 (1)

However, I’m also subtly influencing my kids’ activity levels and including them in participating in the 4km fun run. Then we can all go out for breakfast and pig out with the sense of satisfaction that we have really earned it.

It seems all the rage these days is Running Blogs – I had no idea how popular they have become. Aside from doing running and talking about it, now we can read and write about it. So add this one to the mix.